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Making A Living

Nothing is more powerful than a mother or father with dreams for their kids. By providing training or a small business loan, you can help a parent start a small business so they can feed and educate their children. It’s an investment that will pay dividends for generations.
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Martha had little hope as she saw plant after plant in her garden wither and die. For more than a decade, as the drought in Kenya continued, her family barely survived in their one-bedroom home.

Then ADRA came to her village and taught people how to grow food even with scarce water.  Martha joined the farmers’ association that ADRA created. She received a greenhouse and seeds and learned how to grow tomatoes, spinach, watermelon, and more.

“Now I am empowered to support my family and give back to my community,” Martha says. “I can support myself; I don’t need to rely on anyone anymore.”

She also trains others. “Most of my neighbors now have kitchen gardens. They have nutritious food to eat,” Martha reports. “I run classes from my own home.”

That home is now a three-bedroom house she paid for with money she saved. ADRA taught Martha how to budget and save her earnings. She has also used those savings to create a small shop, where she sells snacks and tea.

  • Reliable income
  • Education & training
  • Self-sufficiency
  • Self-esteem
  • Stability
  • Business development skills
  • Community sustainability
  • Example for the next generation
  • Hope

Martha had little hope as she saw plant after plant in her garden wither and die. For more than a decade, as the drought in Kenya continued, her family barely survived in their one-bedroom home.

Then ADRA came to her village and taught people how to grow food even with scarce water.  Martha joined the farmers’ association that ADRA created. She received a greenhouse and seeds and learned how to grow tomatoes, spinach, watermelon, and more.

“Now I am empowered to support my family and give back to my community,” Martha says. “I can support myself; I don’t need to rely on anyone anymore.”

She also trains others. “Most of my neighbors now have kitchen gardens. They have nutritious food to eat,” Martha reports. “I run classes from my own home.”

That home is now a three-bedroom house she paid for with money she saved. ADRA taught Martha how to budget and save her earnings. She has also used those savings to create a small shop, where she sells snacks and tea.